How ATS war records solved a case

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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Sometimes the details on birth, marriage and death certificates present genealogists with a baffling puzzle of varying dates and changing names. In cases like these, it’s important to remember that a few missing pieces of information hidden in a different data set may be all it takes to get your investigation back on track. Here, Sam Watkin reports on a case that could not have been solved without the information held in military service records.

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A Christmas letter from the Western Front

Posted in For Family Historians, For Relatives

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The photograph above is one of many iconic images of the Christmas truce of 1914. It shows two members of the London Rifle Brigade (left and centre) posing with a group of German soldiers. Here, researcher Cherrill Theobald presents a letter written by an eye-witness to the event – her great uncle Oswald Tilley, who was himself a member of the London Rifle Brigade.

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Will we remember them?

Posted in For Family Historians, For Relatives

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When Peter Jackson’s They Shall Not Grow Old screens on BBC 1 on Armistice Day, it will mark the end of the centenary of World War One. Let’s hope that the film’s extraordinary emotional impact will galvanise more people to add their relatives’ records and stories to Lives of the First World War, the permanent digital memorial set up by the Imperial War Museum.

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When patience and persistence pay off

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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In this article, case manager Carolyn Felgate extends the definition of ‘patience’ and ‘persistence’ as she reports on her ten-year struggle to chip away at an impregnable genealogical brick wall – the case of Mary Margaret Baker.

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Between two families

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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In this article, case manager Sam Watkin discusses an informal adoption arranged before the Adoption of Children Act 1926. When relevant public records are almost entirely absent, how can probate genealogists prove someone’s identity?

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