Britain alone

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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When Royal Mail decided to pay tribute to the war generation with the “homeland heroes” series of postage stamps, they asked Anglia Research to trace three evacuees featured in an iconic photograph taken at Kings Cross station. It was important to establish if the children could be identified and whether they were still alive, in which case their permission would be needed to reproduce the photograph as a stamp. In this article, Peter Turvey explains the historical context in which the photograph was taken and how this meant that the children could be traced.

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A lifeline to independence

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives

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Terry Bridger reports on a case that illustrates how the timely intervention of a probate genealogist can transform a beneficiary’s life, bringing tangible improvements sometimes at the very moment they are most needed.

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Relative success?

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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What happens when a probate researcher spots one of their own relatives’ names on the bona vacantia list? Case manager Terry Bridger knows the answer, because it once happened to her.

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Buried in the marriage register

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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The work of a probate genealogist doesn’t end once all the potential beneficiaries to an estate have been traced. We also have to prove the beneficiaries’ relationship to the deceased. Hearsay and family tradition are not enough. The Treasury Solicitor requires hard evidence – and that means documentary evidence of kinship. In this case history, Oliver Howard discusses one estate that would have reverted to the Crown, had it not been for a flash of insight and a willingness to dig deeper.

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“And people think I have a safe office job”

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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With over 35 years’ experience as a genealogist, local historian and archivist – and a string of qualifications to her name – you might expect to find Anglia Research’s Terry Bridger in the rarified atmosphere of a record office or, at the very least, safe at a desk in front of a computer. Not in a hazmat suit, hacking a path to someone’s front door with a pair of shears. In this article, she describes the gritty reality of a probate researcher’s work.

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