AGRA accreditation - what it means and why it matters

Posted in For Relatives, For Solicitors

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Since the 1970s there has been an explosion of interest in genealogy, with a corresponding growth in the number of ‘professional’ genealogists. Yet, 40 years on, people still struggle to judge the credentials of different service providers and to distinguish between the various logos that are used on different websites. In this article, Peter Turvey describes the main method for serious genealogists to achieve bona fide professional accreditation.

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A note on upcoming changes to the rules of intestacy

Posted in For Relatives, For Solicitors

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The Inheritance and Trustees’ Power Act 2014, due to come into effect on 1 October, makes a number of changes to the intestacy rules. Broadly, these ensure that estate distribution is more favourable to the deceased's surviving spouse or civil partner.

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Behind the scenes at WDYTYA?

Posted in For Family Historians, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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Anglia Research’s Eileen Butcher – who appears in the latest episode of Who Do You Think You Are? – offers us a glimpse behind the scenes of the BBC’s showcase genealogy programme.

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Mothers on marriage certificates - a genealogist’s point of view

Posted in For Family Historians, For Relatives

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Today the Prime Minister announced that he has instructed the Home Office to allow mothers' names to appear on English and Welsh marriage certificates. The issue of those missing mothers’ names has been a genealogist’s gripe for many years. In this interview, Peter Turvey explains why it matters for family history and particularly for probate research.

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Bringing families back together

Posted in For Family Historians, For Relatives

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Most people are aware that the job of a probate researcher involves finding the living relatives of someone who has died without a will and ensuring they get their rightful inheritance. But for staff at Anglia Research there’s another, less publicised, aspect to their work – and it has nothing to do with heirs and the money they may receive. In this interview, Sue Jackson and Hannah Cutts explain what makes their work so rewarding.

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