A question of identity

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives

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In an era where we shred bank statements, juggle passwords and fret about identity theft, Kay Morgan discusses the story of a man who willingly allowed his friend to borrow his identity and explains why this was not uncommon in twentieth-century Ireland.

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Problem heir hunters prey on unsuspecting beneficiaries

Posted in Case Histories, Fairness Campaigns, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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At Anglia Research we are committed to helping the victims of negligence and malpractice. In this case history, Philip Turvey describes what happens when potential beneficiaries fall prey to unscrupulous heir hunters who conduct the minimum of research.

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Copy-cat government websites

Posted in Fairness Campaigns, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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Despite years of campaigning, client care remains at risk from copycat government websites – and nowhere is this more true than in the world of probate.

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Irish genealogy: missing records and amazing memories

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives

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In this article regional executive Kay Morgan looks at the challenge of researching Irish family history and explains why she finds it so rewarding.

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All in a name

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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People change their names for a wide variety of reasons – to avoid discrimination, to escape domestic abuse, to make a clean break from their past. While their motivations are very often practical, they can occasionally be whimsical (as a great many Wayne Rooneys, Amy Winehouses and Michael Jacksons can confirm). But, if someone changes their name and subsequently dies intestate, they may have made it very difficult for anyone to trace their next of kin: the names on their birth certificate and death certificate don't match. In this article, case manager and former police inspector Graham Underwood discusses the tools and strategies he uses when a birth certificate proves hard to find, and describes a particularly difficult bona vacantia case that involved a change of name.

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