The history behind your birth certificate

Posted in For Relatives, For Solicitors

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As the gateway to basic legal entitlement, birth registration is one of our most fundamental human rights: the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child acknowledges that every child should “be registered immediately after birth”. In this article, Peter Turvey looks at the long and sometimes tortuous road to full birth registration in England and Wales.

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Row, row, row your boat

Posted in For Relatives, For Solicitors

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At Anglia Research we admire tenacity and determination, which is why we are sponsoring Yorkshire Rows, a team of four intrepid women who will set off this December on a 3,000 mile journey across the Atlantic from La Gomera in the Canaries to Antigua. In this interview, team member Frances Davies (pictured left, above) explains why she’s taking part in the Talisker Whisky Challenge, and how the team plans to cross the ocean with only their oars to propel them.

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Great Anglo-American Alliances #3: Anglia Research offers US customers a free review of unsolved cases

Posted in For Solicitors

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Anglo-American partnerships have shaped and changed history. The transatlantic alliance that won World War Two and preserved freedom was built by the child of a marriage of English status and tradition to American wealth and energy.

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Digitising records - making an informed choice

Posted in For Solicitors

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Earlier this year, Google vice-president Vint Cerf warned that our digital records may not stand the test of time. In this article, Kelvin Smith, former records management consultant at The National Archives, looks at the feasibility and desirability of digitising records.

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“As a genealogist, it’s my job to ask questions”

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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In the past illegitimate births were shrouded in shame and secrecy. As a result illegitimate children, who have often missed out on family life, are all too easily missed from a family tree. Sometimes the only way you can find out about them is by asking difficult questions. In this case study Dr Lisa Hill tells the poignant story of Margaret, a Barnardo’s child who now works as a volunteer for the organisation that brought her up.

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