Family history changes lives

Posted in Case Histories, For Relatives, For Solicitors

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Through her work with Who Do You Think You Are? Eileen Butcher has helped a fair few celebrities unearth their family history, but she’s equally at home helping some of the country’s most vulnerable people rediscover their past. In this interview she discusses the work that Anglia Research does for The Money Carer Foundation (MCF), a not-for-profit organisation that supports adults who are not able to manage their own financial affairs.

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The risks and rewards of a low value case

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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More than two and a half million Jews fled Russia between 1881 and 1914. Many of the records that documented their lives in the Pale of Settlement have been destroyed by pogroms, revolution and war. This makes researching Russian-Jewish ancestry a daunting task, and one that some probate research companies shy away from. In this article, Hannah Cutts discusses a risky case that remained on the bona vacantia list for seven years.

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Great Anglo-American Alliances #3: Anglia Research offers US customers a free review of unsolved cases

Posted in For Solicitors

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Anglo-American partnerships have shaped and changed history. The transatlantic alliance that won World War Two and preserved freedom was built by the child of a marriage of English status and tradition to American wealth and energy.

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Digitising records - making an informed choice

Posted in For Solicitors

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Earlier this year, Google vice-president Vint Cerf warned that our digital records may not stand the test of time. In this article, Kelvin Smith, former records management consultant at The National Archives, looks at the feasibility and desirability of digitising records.

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“As a genealogist, it’s my job to ask questions”

Posted in Case Histories, For Family Historians, For Relatives

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In the past illegitimate births were shrouded in shame and secrecy. As a result illegitimate children, who have often missed out on family life, are all too easily missed from a family tree. Sometimes the only way you can find out about them is by asking difficult questions. In this case study Dr Lisa Hill tells the poignant story of Margaret, a Barnardo’s child who now works as a volunteer for the organisation that brought her up.

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